terms
Toning Highlights
2017/6/28

Blend a new color into the brighter part of your photo.

Some photo editing software provides this option for you to add a different color to the brighter parts of an image. In the examples below, we shift the hue of the added color while maintaining its saturation. In actual photo editing applications, you are usually given the options to both controls the hue and saturation of the added color.

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Tint
2017/6/28

Color your photo by the time of day.

People have very different interpretations of tint changes to the visual looks of the photos. Some describe the feeling as the purple to green, or energetic to quiet, or afternoon to morning. The magenta–green slider is sometimes provided in addition to the blue–yellow color temperature slider to provide more control to simulate ambient light.

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Temperature
2017/6/28

Cooler to warmer feeling photos.

In digital photography, color temperature is sometimes used interchangeably with white balance, which allows a remapping of color values to simulate variations in ambient color temperature. Most digital cameras and RAW image software provide presets simulating specific ambient values (e.g., sunny, cloudy, tungsten, etc.) while others allow explicit entry of white balance values in Kelvin. These settings vary color values along the blue–yellow axis, while some software includes additional controls (sometimes labeled tint) adding the magenta–green axis, and are to some extent arbitrary and subject to artistic interpretation.

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Sharpen
2017/6/28

Make your photo look crisp.

Sharpness describes the clarity of detail in a photo and can be a valuable creative tool for emphasizing texture. Sharpening is intended to make edges in your photo look crisp. It can’t bring out-of-focus images into focus, but if your subject is in fact in focus, it can make it look significantly sharper. It does this by adding contrast to edges — that is, it brightens the bright side of an edge and darkens the dark side. In essence, it adds a very narrow shadow along an edge — and to our eye, shadows make things look more three dimensional.

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Shadows
2017/6/28

Change the maximum darkness of your photo.

Think this as the reverse of adjusting highlights. Adjusting shadows change the brightness of the darkest portion of your image. These portions are usually physical shadows or parts that are not lit by light sources. Making the shadows brighter in your photo recovers details from the darker portions of the image, and makes your photo look more well-lit.

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Exposure
2017/6/28

Change your photo from dark to bright.

Exposure is the amount of light per unit area reaching a photographic film or electronic image sensor, as determined by shutter speed, lens aperture, and scene luminance. Shifting your exposure is like changing the in-camera settings in post-production. To be more technical, it scales the settings up and down by a constant multiplying factor. Moving this slider either increases or decreases all of the elements that go into obtaining the correct exposure at once.

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Toning Shadows
2017/6/28

Blend a new color into the darker part of your photos.

Some photo editing software provides this option for you to add a different color to the darker parts of an image. In the examples below, we shift the hue of the added color while maintaining its saturation. In actual photo editing applications, you are usually given the options to both controls the hue and saturation of the added color.

→ READ MORE
Blacks
2017/6/28

Make the dark parts darker.

Blacks control is similar to shadows; but it targets a wider range of the darker parts of your photo and adjusts the brightness of them, therefore making it more effective to adjust larger areas of shades and under lit surfaces while not affecting the brighter parts of your photo. Use this to define a new darkness level for a large dark area.

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Highlights
2017/6/28

Change the maximum brightness of your photo.

Adjusting highlights change the brightness of the brightest portion of your images, such as the sky, reflections of the sun, or any bright areas lit by a glowing body. This is very useful when a small part of your image is too bright, over-exposed, or loses the details due to its brightness, and you want to dim them down a little.

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HSL
2017/6/28

Change the colorfulness of specific color.

HSL helps you adjust specific colors' hue, saturation, and luminance. Most often the editing software will provide controls of colors including red, orange, yellow, green, aqua, blue, purple and magenta. In the example below, we show the shifting of saturation for the red color channel. Shifting the saturation for other colors share the same concept in principle.w

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Vignette
2017/6/28

Bring focus to your subject.

Vignette is a reduction of an image's brightness or saturation at the periphery compared to the image center. The word vignette, from the same root as vine, originally referred to a decorative border in a book. Later, the word came to be used for a photographic portrait which is clear in the center and fades off at the edges. A similar effect occurs when filming projected images or movies off a projection screen.

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Whites
2017/6/28

Make the bright parts brighter.

Whites control is similar to highlights; but it targets a wider range of the brighter parts of your photo, therefore making it more effective to adjust larger areas of bright scenery and objects while not affecting the darker parts in your photo. Use this to define a new brightness level for a large bright area.

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Distortion
2017/6/28

Make wide-angle or fish-eye looking photos.

Distortion can be used to calibrate actual physical lens distortion or create artificial feelings of fish-eye or wide-angle looking photos. When straight lines are curved inwards in a shape of a barrel, this type of aberration is called barrel distortion. Pincushion distortion is the exact opposite of barrel distortion – straight lines are curved outwards from the center. This type of distortion is commonly seen on telephoto lenses, and it occurs due to image magnification increasing towards the edges of the frame from the optical axis.

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Clarity
2017/6/28

Make your photo look more three dimensional.

Clarity makes your subject look more three dimensional, by adding contrast to edges (in a much broader way than sharpening). The bright side of edges gets brighter, the dark side, darker. A positive clarity value punches up an image, makes it look a little more three-dimensional, by enhancing contrast along edges. The changes are concentrated in the midtones and do little to highlights and shadows.

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Diffuse
2017/6/28

Add ambient light to your photo.

The diffuse tool adds the look of soft, ambient lighting throughout your photo. Diffuse can be used to adjust the lighting of atmospheric conditions (for example, on a sunrise to make the photo look like it was taken later in the day). Diffuse can also be used to alter seasonal conditions in a photo.

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Fringing
2017/6/28

Add dizziness to your photo.

Fringing zooms in and out the different color channels for your photo and creates a fringing effect that simulates camera shakes and dizziness. Sometimes you will see people use such effect to produce the feeling of impact wave or simply madness or in memory of people who've entertained you and made you feel happy and/or flattered.

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Dehaze
2017/6/27

Remove ‘fogginess’ from your photo.

The dehaze tool is useful for removing the gloomy look associated with ‘fogginess' within a photo. Use dehaze on a night sky photo, for instance, to remove the cloud cover that obscures the stars.

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Vibrance
2017/6/27

Think it as smart saturation.

Increasing a photo's vibrance will bring up the colors in areas that have weak saturation, while areas that have high saturation levels remain unaffected. Vibrance is especially useful for bringing up the colors in photos of people. It is very kind on skin tones because it will not over saturate them, causing the colors to be unrealistically bright. Most of the time, you will find the results you're looking for by changing the vibrance instead of the saturation because it does not affect every pixel in the image.

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Saturation
2017/6/27

Make your photo more colorful.

When you increase the image's saturation, you brighten and deepen the colors in the photo all over to cause your photo to look a lot more colorful. When you decrease the saturation, you remove the depth and deepness of the colors. Dragging the image's saturation bar all the way to the left will cause the image to become black and white. However, over-saturated photos look unnatural and sometimes you want to rely on the adjusting Vibrance.

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Contrast
2017/6/27

Make your subject more distinguishable.

Contrast is the difference in luminance or color that makes an object (or its representation in the image) distinguishable. In visual perception of the real world, contrast is determined by the difference in the color and brightness of the object and other objects within the same field of view.

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